Vanessa Wolfe

Copywriting: A Graphic Designer’s Paradox

As a designer, creating captivating copy is not my strong suit. I am much more comfortable dealing with color, photography, typography and form. As far as creating actual copy for an ad or article, well that strikes a bit of fear and anxiety into me. In the past, I always believed that copy should come from a copywriter because they specialize in writing amazing copy, while designers specialize in the visuals. As time goes on I am realizing that adding copywriting to my skill-set will benefit me and my clients in the long run. So yes, designers should, (and are capable of learning), write copy. Here is why:

  1. Attract more clients: By integrating copywriting into your toolbox, many companies will find your service more appealing, convenient, and beneficial. Offering copywriting and design will help your clients see you as the most comprehensive solution.
  2. You know your client the best: It makes much more sense for you to be in charge of the copy instead of handing it over to someone who is not as entrenched as you are. The more ingrained you become with your clients, the more loyalty and trust you can build into the relationship.
  3. Your work will be stronger: Strong visuals do not work if you have poorly written copy just as great copy will not work if you have poor visuals.
  4. Writing is a skill that can be learned: Graphic designers are creative thinkers and writing is a creative endeavor so there is no real reason why a designer cannot learn to be creative writer.

By developing the fundamentals of writing, you can gain invaluable experience in the field of marketing, increase the value of your work, and make your clients happier. If you are interested in learning more about the basics of copywriting I highly suggest reading, “Copywriting: Successful Writing for Design, Advertising and Marketing” by Mark Shaw. This book gives great copywriting tips, exercises, and case studies.